CFS Blog

CFS Blog is a dedicated content rich resource for people wanting to keep up to date on latest trends in the finance industry. We reveal tips and strategies that help you achieve your financial independence.

Selecting the Right Real Estate Agent

- Saturday, December 05, 2009

When it comes to selling your property the help of a professional real estate agent is invaluable, but it’s important you choose one carefully.

Selling a home or investment property is a major step. Employing the assistance of an agent can ensure a smoother, quicker, and less stressful process as well as attracting the best sale price.

While there is always the temptation to sell your property privately to save on fees, this can be a false economy in the long run.

A good agent can generally offer a much wider forum through which to promote your property; they also have a network of prospective buyers that can be pointed in your direction.

There is also the added incentive of engaging a veteran negotiator who can maximise your chances of selling for top dollar, therefore offsetting their agency fee.

Of course, the degree to which an estate agent will be able to assist you will vary, so it’s important to select your agent carefully.

Ask around
Check with friends and family about their experiences with local agents. They may be able to recommend an agent they really liked working with or know of one with a good reputation.
Test the water

Approach at least three agents and compare, first of all, how they make you feel. Did you like them? Did you trust them? Are you confident in the way they approached your meeting and how they might interact with prospective buyers? What about their office and receptionist? Listen to your instincts and avoid any agents who make you feel uncomfortable.
Plan of action

A professional agent should be able to produce a formal marketing strategy to show exactly how they are going to market your home. Also ask for a list of recent sales to demonstrate their performance.
The whole package

Although it’s tempting to choose the agent who tells you they’ll get the highest price, don’t be fooled into choosing an agent on price alone. There are agents who will inflate this figure just to secure your listing, leaving you disappointed when they cannot in fact sell your property for that price. The best way to know what your property is worth is to have it valued by a professional, unbiased valuer. This will also put you in a stronger position when liaising with prospective agents.
A fair price

Agents charge a commission anywhere from between one and three per cent of the selling price. While this is a point to consider, don’t let it be the deciding factor.

Disclaimer


This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd or any of its employees or subsidiaries. It is intended to provide general news and information only. While every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information it contains, neither the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd,'Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd's employees, or its subsidiaries, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omission. Copyright is reserved throughout. No part of this article can be reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd expect for the use for which it was purchased for. All information is current as per the date of delivery and Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd will take no responsibility for any factors that may change thereafter. The purchaser of this article and all readers thereafter are advised to contact their financial adviser, broker or accountant before making any investment decisions and should not rely on this article as a substitute for professional advice.




10 Simple Tips to Add Value to your Home

- Thursday, November 12, 2009

Polishing up your house with some simple renovations and TLC can really sharpen its appeal as well as maximise your profit potential – and it needn’t break the bank.

Here are some simple and affordable ways to boost your home’s sale potential so you can maximise your resources for the more exciting project – your new home!

  1. Make an entrance – ensure a strong first impression with a welcoming doorway. Think sparkling footpaths and porches and new pot plants. A new front door may also be an inexpensive way to spruce up your entrance, along with a new doormat.
  2. A green trim – a well groomed garden is the perfect way to frame your home. Get your lawn in tip top condition, weed the garden, remove any shabby plants and introduce some cheerful flowers.
  3. Cleanliness is next to godliness – get out a bucket and brush and scrub away the years of grime from your bricks and windows.
  4. Shiny coat – nothing will freshen up your house more than a coat of fresh paint.
  5. The small things – new fittings and fixtures can easily modernise an older home. Think door handles, cupboard handles and taps.
  6. Repair time – the time to sell is the perfect time to tackle those odd jobs such as broken fly screens, cracked window panes or broken blinds. They may be fiddly tasks but they will give your home a more polished finish.
  7. Beautify the bathroom – a dirty looking bathroom can be an instant turn off so take the time to replace any dripping or rusty taps and fixtures. A new toilet seat is also an easy way to spruce up a bathroom as are new fluffy towels.
  8. Clean carpets – a steam clean will only cost a few hundred dollars and help restore your carpets to their former glory. Add some sparkle – polish floorboards and shampoo rugs.
  9. De-clutter – the easiest and cheapest way to add value to your home is by having a big clean out and removing any junk.

<Disclaimer>
This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd or any of its employees or subsidiaries. It is intended to provide general news cand information only. While every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information it contains, neither the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd,'Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd's employees, or its subsidiaries, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omission. Copyright is reserved throughout. No part of this article can be reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd expect for the use for which it was purchased for. All information is current as per the date of delivery and Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd will take no responsibility for any factors that may change thereafter. The purchaser of this article and all readers thereafter are advised to contact their financial adviser, broker or accountant before making any investment decisions and should not rely on this article as a substitute for professional advice.



Take Your Tax Return Further

- Thursday, November 12, 2009

Dedicating your tax return to your mortgage can save you thousands

You should have lodged your 2008-09 tax return by now – the cut off was 31 October. While some may be expecting an unwelcome tax bill, for many others a tax rebate might be on its way.

So what exactly should you do with your tax refund?

While it may be tempting to purchase that new lounge suite you’ve been thinking about or splurge on a weekend away, putting your tax return towards your mortgage could save you considerable money in the long term, making it an option well worth considering.

What you could save

We all know that the sooner we reduce a mortgage the less interest we will pay in the long run – but how much exactly could you be looking to save?

Take a tax return of just $1,000 for example. On a 30 year $300,000 home loan at an interest rate of 5.75 per cent, a lump sum payment of $1,000 could save you around $3,000 over the life of the loan while reducing its term by more than two months.

Imagine the results if you did this several times during the life of your loan.

Of course the greater the size of your payment the more dramatic the results. If you had a tax rebate of $10,000 and used it on the above-mentioned loan, you could knock a whole year off your mortgage term and save close to $30,000 in interest.

A long term approach

Don’t forget, this philosophy will work just as well should you increase your regular mortgage repayments – even if it’s by as little as $50 a month.

On the same home loan as above, increasing monthly repayments from the minimum of $1,750 to $1,800 would take one and a half years off your loan term and save you over $17,000 in interest.

So this financial year, dedicate a good portion of your tax return to your mortgage and make extra repayments part of your overall loan strategy – and reap the long term benefits.


<Disclaimer>
This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd or any of its employees or subsidiaries. It is intended to provide general news cand information only. While every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information it contains, neither the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd,'Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd's employees, or its subsidiaries, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omission. Copyright is reserved throughout. No part of this article can be reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd expect for the use for which it was purchased for. All information is current as per the date of delivery and Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd will take no responsibility for any factors that may change thereafter. The purchaser of this article and all readers thereafter are advised to contact their financial adviser, broker or accountant before making any investment decisions and should not rely on this article as a substitute for professional advice.



Reverse Mortgages - Options for Older Australians

- Wednesday, November 11, 2009

If you’re retired and own your own home a reverse mortgage could be the key to unlocking a more comfortable lifestyle.

You’ve put in the hard yards and now own your home yet you don’t have much spare cash to play with. This situation is a reality for many older Australians who did not have the opportunity to benefit from superannuation.

There is always the option of selling the family home to release a lifetime’s hard earned savings but the prospect of retiring to rented accommodation is not one that appeals to most.

A reverse mortgage offers seniors, usually over the age of 60, the ability to release some of the equity that they have built in their home to finance their lifestyle.

There is a range of ways to access the equity, which include drawing down a one-off lump sum for expenses – such as holidays or a renovation – or as a regular income stream to simply improve the day-to-day quality of life.

The amount you’ll be eligible to access will depend on your own personal circumstances but usually home owners can draw anywhere up to 40 per cent of the value of their home.

Unlike a loan no repayments are required as the lender simply takes the amount drawn from the sale price of the home once you sell the property or pass away. You will however be charged interest on the amount you borrow against your home, which will be added to the loan balance.

A word of caution

While a reverse mortgage can greatly improve cash flow and enhance the quality of life for seniors, borrowing against your home requires careful consideration and ongoing diligence to ensure you don’t end up spending away your most important asset.

The rate of interest on a reverse mortgage will usually be higher than a regular home loan and it compounds over the term of the loan, meaning your level of debt can rise quite rapidly. For this reason it is important to draw on the loan carefully and monitor how quickly your debt is rising.

In the very worst case scenario, you may end up in what is called negative equity, where the value of your debt is greater than the value of your home. Many lenders offer guarantees that you’ll never owe more than the value of your home, but not all – so it’s an important point to remember.

Like to know more about reverse mortgages.

<Disclaimer>
This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the author/s,  Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd or any of its employees or subsidiaries. It is intended to provide general news cand information only. While every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information it contains, neither the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd,'Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd's employees, or its subsidiaries, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omission. Copyright is reserved throughout. No part of this article can be reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd expect for the use for which it was purchased for. All information is current as per the date of delivery and Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd will take no responsibility for any factors that may change thereafter. The purchaser of this article and all readers thereafter are advised to contact their financial adviser, broker or accountant before making any investment decisions and should not rely on this article as a substitute for professional advice.




Capitalising on Cash Flow

- Saturday, October 17, 2009

Saving your cash is a smart start to your wealth building strategy. There’s no doubt that leveraging with ‘good’ debt offers a fantastic way to build your personal wealth, but learning to stash your cash is equally important in building financial security and stability.

 

While Australians aren’t exactly known as a nation of savers, with household savings levels plummeting since the 1970s, the recent financial crisis has served as a healthy reminder that it pays to have money saved ‘for a rainy day’.

 

But what is the most effective strategy for managing your savings and what options are out there?

 

Regular savings schemes

 

This is an ideal strategy to build some sort of nest egg, perhaps towards a future goal, but also to keep aside in the case of unemployment or an unexpected health issue.

 

The best way to save regularly is to organise a direct deposit scheme that channels a set amount of cash into a savings account every month. This ensures you keep your savings on track and will also see you save without even realising it.

 

While the low Reserve Bank of Australia cash rate means cash returns have fallen in recent months many banks are still offering some pretty compelling deals. Shop around, particularly online, to find the best offers and remember that different banks’ rates do vary significantly – so don’t sign up to the first deal you find.

 

Term deposits

 

When it comes to capitalising on cash, a term deposit can offer excellent returns. Your money is locked in the bank for a set period and in return the bank will reward you with some of the highest available interest rates.

 

Your options range anywhere from 30, 60 or 90 days to as long as several years; the larger the deposit and the longer the term, the higher the return will generally be.

 

The downside is you’ll be charged a fee if you break the agreed term which may cancel out any interest that’s been earned.

 

Mortgage offset account

 

Extra savings can be used to offset the amount owed on your mortgage. While this approach doesn’t earn you interest on your savings it reduces the interest you pay on your home loan. Your daily cash deposit amount is effectively deducted from the overall sum owing on your mortgage, reducing the interest repayment. At today’s rates that can be equivalent to a saving of 5 per cent or more, and because you are saving rather than earning interest, it is non-taxable!


<Disclaimer>

This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the author/s,  Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd or any of its employees or subsidiaries. It is intended to provide general news cand information only. While every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information it contains, neither the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd,'Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd's employees, or its subsidiaries, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omission. Copyright is reserved throughout. No part of this article can be reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd expect for the use for which it was purchased for. All information is current as per the date of delivery and Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd will take no responsibility for any factors that may change thereafter. The purchaser of this article and all readers thereafter are advised to contact their financial adviser, broker or accountant before making any investment decisions and should not rely on this article as a substitute for professional advice.




10 Top Tips for Property Investment

- Thursday, October 15, 2009

There are rich rewards to be reaped from property investment, especially in the current market. Follow these tried and tested tips to help you get the most out of your investment.

1.    Do your homework: Nothing makes for a better investment platform than solid research and a sound understanding of the property market. Start perusing property magazines, get along to seminars, and keep your ear to the ground for any hot property trends.

2.    Get a loan pre-approval: This is a key way to ensure you won’t miss out on the right property at the right time. A pre-approved home loan is a green light for buying and will also give you a realistic idea of your borrowing capacity.

3.    Do the rounds: When it comes to becoming a seasoned investor nothing can boost your proficiency more than experience. Visit as many properties as you can before putting cash on the table so you know how to spot a bargain – and a rip off.

4.    Apartment versus house: Decide whether you want to invest in an apartment or a house. There are pros and cons for both options; what may be a better investment will also depend on the area.

5.    Old versus new: Once again there are pros and cons for investing in new and established properties, so take the time to think about what will be best for you.

6.    Location, location, location: A golden rule for a solid investment is to choose a property close to amenities: transport, supermarkets, schools and hospitals – the more nearby facilities, the better.

7.    Think tenants: Carefully consider the type of tenant you want to attract before deciding what and where to buy. So, for example, if you’re looking to attract professional tenants you’ll need to make sure your property appeals to that segment.

8.    Maximise your finances: Your investment choice will depend on your own personal finances and financial goals, so speak to us about what might be the best strategy for you; also visit an accountant to learn about tax efficient investing – if you don’t have one we can help point you in the right direction.

9.    Keep some cash on hand: Once you’ve bought your property it’s crucial to maintain a slush fund for general maintenance as well as any surprise repair work that may pop up.

10.  Keep your cool: While it may be tempting to snap up a bargain, it pays to take some time to negotiate. Don’t take the sale price without haggling – you’ll be surprised how far some sellers may come down.


Would you like to know if you can purchase an investment property? The why not arrange an obligation free consultation session to discuss the possibilities of owning an investment property.

Link to Know more about investment property then contact us today.

<Disclaimer>

This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the author/s,  Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd or any of its employees or subsidiaries. It is intended to provide general news cand information only. While every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information it contains, neither the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd,'Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd's employees, or its subsidiaries, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omission. Copyright is reserved throughout. No part of this article can be reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd expect for the use for which it was purchased for. All information is current as per the date of delivery and Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd will take no responsibility for any factors that may change thereafter. The purchaser of this article and all readers thereafter are advised to contact their financial adviser, broker or accountant before making any investment decisions and should not rely on this article as a substitute for professional advice.




Bridging the Gap

- Thursday, October 15, 2009

Bridging finance might just be the solution for your buying and selling cash flow concerns.

When you’re on the hunt for a new home, chances are the sale of your existing place is unlikely to align perfectly with the purchase of your new home.

That means that most sellers are faced with the daunting prospect of either shouldering the burden of two mortgages should they buy before their home has sold, or a stint in rental property while they find a new home.

If you can’t face the prospect of weeks or months living out of cardboard boxes in a short term rental or a motel, then a bridging loan may be the solution you’re looking for.

How does it work?


In general terms a bridging loan can be used to cover your financing requirements if the sale and purchase settlement dates of properties differ by a short period. It can also offer you a solution for a longer period of up to six or 12 months, if, for instance, you’ve found a new property but are yet to have sold your existing home or perhaps haven’t finished building your new one.

Like any home loan you will accrue interest on the amount borrowed. Your repayment requirements will depend on the lender but in most instances it will be interest only. In some cases no repayments will be required at all, but it is always wise to make repayments to avoid your interest obligations spiralling out of control.

To bridge or not to bridge


While it may sound like an ideal solution, bridging finance requires careful consideration – just like any other financial decision. Be sure to seek professional, sound advice tailored to your individual circumstances and needs. We can help you determine whether bridging finance is your best option, or if perhaps another solution, such as renting between properties, will work out better – so give us a call.


Benefits of bridging


  • You can buy a new home without worrying about selling your existing home first
  • If you’re building a new home you don’t have to worry about renting in between
  • There is less pressure to sell your existing home quickly, meaning you won’t be pressured into accepting a lower sales price

<Disclaimer>

This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the author/s,  Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd or any of its employees or subsidiaries. It is intended to provide general news cand information only. While every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information it contains, neither the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd,'Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd's employees, or its subsidiaries, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omission. Copyright is reserved throughout. No part of this article can be reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd expect for the use for which it was purchased for. All information is current as per the date of delivery and Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd will take no responsibility for any factors that may change thereafter. The purchaser of this article and all readers thereafter are advised to contact their financial adviser, broker or accountant before making any investment decisions and should not rely on this article as a substitute for professional advice.






Units No Longer Housing Poor Cousin

- Monday, October 12, 2009

The capital growth associated with apartments has virtually been on par with detached housing over the last five years, putting to bed the myth that houses appreciate at a faster rate than units.

Many home buyers and investors have adopted the philosophy that houses will generally outperform units. Most would argue that the underlying value of the land associated with a house is the real driver of capital growth. However over the last five years there has been little difference between the two property types based on the rate of capital growth. Nationally, houses have recorded an annualised rate of capital growth of 4.8 percent while unit values have increased by 4.7 percent per annum over the same period.

The equivalent level of capital growth associated with units is a relatively new phenomenon. Over the last ten years houses have outperformed units by about two percent per annum.


The improvement in capital growth associated with units may be attributable to housing affordability. Based on the national house value ($506,000) and national unit value ($409,000), units are about $100,000 more affordable than houses; a fairly compelling differential for many home buyers.

Another reason for the improvement in unit values is the changing demand side factors in the Australian market place. More baby boomers are downsizing from their empty nest; twenty and thirty something’s are more interested in living in the same location as where they work and play; and the lack of purpose built student accommodation has seen demand for units increase markedly from the overseas student sector.

Developers have responded accordingly, introducing units designed for a very specific segment of the market: luxurious boutique apartments for the empty nesters, smaller one and two bedroom apartments with minimal kitchen facilities for the young professionals and tiny apartments with communal social areas for the student market are just a few examples.

Additionally, units tend to provide higher rental yields than houses. This is partly due to the fact that unit developments are typically located in areas that have high rental demand: close to major transport networks, employment nodes or retail centres.

With population growth now projected to be well beyond expectations (Treasury recently announced that the Australian population is projected to reach 35 million in 40 years time; 7 million more residents than was originally forecast) and strategic land supply likely to remain constrained for a long time, the demand for well located unit projects is likely to increase. .

Source : RP DATA





The Fruits of Property Investment

- Wednesday, September 09, 2009

If you’re looking to set yourself up for the future, the property market is a great investment choice – and now is the perfect time to jump in.

For as long as most of us can remember owning our own home has been the great Australian dream, but the trend towards owning several properties is growing in popularity and it’s not hard to understand why.
Property investment is increasingly being recognised as a fantastic wealth building tool. To get the most out of property it is best to view it as a long term investment or means of generating what is referred to as capital growth.

Why invest in property?

Historically, property prices in Australia have doubled in value every seven to 12 years, offering a steady path to wealth creation.

Compared to other investment options, such as shares or other complex financial products, bricks and mortar also remain a relatively safe investment.

You won’t need a degree to understand the fundamentals of property investment, and provided you do a little bit of homework there’s a fair chance it will deliver good results.

In contrast to financial markets property has also proven to be much less volatile. Over the course of the financial crisis, the Australian share market lost around 40 per cent of its value while most housing markets only dipped slightly or simply remained flat. According to RP Data, for example, overall property values fell by just 2.6 per cent in the 2008 calendar year.

As well as potential long term capital gains, an investment property can offer you good returns now. The rental income you receive on a property can help cover your mortgage repayments, and in a market such as today’s – when interest rates are low – your rental income may even cover all, or more, than your loan commitments. This will leave you with positive cash flow while your investment essentially pays for itself.

Current opportunities


Current fundamentals in the property market are shaping up to offer some of the best conditions in years. With house prices having softened over the last few years, intense housing shortages combined with low interest rates make positive cash flow opportunities a reality – now is an ideal time to consider an investment purchase.

If you already own a property you may be able to use equity that has built up to fund a new investment.

In fact, once you have your first property under your belt the opportunities for more investments will continue to blossom, with each property giving you greater leveraging power and opportunity to invest further.

To find out your investment options be sure to give us a call – we’ll find the ideal financing strategy and investment property to suit your needs.

<Disclaimer>

This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the author/s,  Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd or any of its employees or subsidiaries. It is intended to provide general news cand information only. While every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information it contains, neither the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd,'Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd's employees, or its subsidiaries, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omission. Copyright is reserved throughout. No part of this article can be reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd expect for the use for which it was purchased for. All information is current as per the date of delivery and Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd will take no responsibility for any factors that may change thereafter. The purchaser of this article and all readers thereafter are advised to contact their financial adviser, broker or accountant before making any investment decisions and should not rely on this article as a substitute for professional advice.







Pre-approval – power to the buyer

- Monday, August 03, 2009

Whether you’re on the Saturday morning auctions circuit or negotiating with real estate agents, securing a loan pre-approved could make the difference between finding your dream home and actually buying it!

A pre-approval is essentially a guarantee from a lender that they will loan you an agreed sum before you have made a commitment to buying a property.

Knowing your borrowing capabilities before you set foot in the property market is a big advantage as you’re able to hone your search to the properties that are within your budget. But a pre-approved loan is also a powerful negotiation tool in both a buyers and sellers market.

With cash at the ready you’ll have the edge over prospective buyers that have a question mark over their finances – and this can give you a distinct advantage.

Bidding at actions is considerably safer with your finances already intact. Not only do you have a clear idea of your maximum threshold, you know you can move quickly to settle.

But a pre-approval will also strengthen your hand when dealing with a real estate agent or vendor for a property that’s for sale by negotiation. With your finances in order, you’ll have the edge when it comes to haggling on price as you have the bargaining power to offer a faster settlement.

So what’s involved in the pre-approval process, and more importantly how can you secure one?

You may be surprised to hear that the pre-approval process is fast and simple. After an assessment of your financial situation the lender will calculate your borrowing capacity and can sometimes issue a pre-approval in a matter of minutes. Once confirmed, your pre-approval usually has a life of three months.

If you’re thinking about buying a property or are interested in finding out about your borrowing capabilities give your broker a call.

<Disclaimer>

This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the author/s,  Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd or any of its employees or subsidiaries. It is intended to provide general news cand information only. While every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information it contains, neither the author/s, Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd,'Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd's employees, or its subsidiaries, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omission. Copyright is reserved throughout. No part of this article can be reproduced or reprinted without the express permission of Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd expect for the use for which it was purchased for. All information is current as per the date of delivery and Carruthers Financial Services Pty Ltd will take no responsibility for any factors that may change thereafter. The purchaser of this article and all readers thereafter are advised to contact their financial adviser, broker or accountant before making any investment decisions and should not rely on this article as a substitute for professional advice.









 
David Carruthers is a credit representative (Credit Representative Number [400226]) of BLSSA Pty Ltd (Australian Credit Licence No. 391237).